Your Questions About For Those In Peril On The Sea

January 30, 2014
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Jenny asks…

What effect did WW2 have on Australian Identity?

Help greatly appreciated. Thanks.

admin answers:

Beginning as a bit of a re-run of WW1, Australia entered the war with the UK and sent troops to Europe as they had previously. Australian troops fought with distinction in North Africa, but were defeated despite fighting well in Greece and Crete… The Germans were very skilled and a formidable enemy.

However, Japanese aggression became more obvious and threatening in 1940-41. Australia was fearful of the ‘yellow peril’, as a small and weak ‘European’ country. Churchill was determined to use Australian (as well as other Commonwealth) troops to serve his ends- the preservation of Britain. In mid-1941 the Australian government demanded the British take the 9th Australian Division out of Tobruk- the unit had to be kept ‘in being’ and could not be allowed to be captured, in case it was needed to fight Japan.

The Japanese attack in December 1941 was not a surprise, except in its exact timing. With France and Holland, who owned Indochina (Vietnam) and Dutch East Indies (Indonesia), captured, the anti-Japanese position in Asia looked bad. The Japanese captured Malaya and Singapore quickly, in large part because Churchill weakened them to provided troops, planes, naval units and skilled leaders for elsewhere (even sending tanks to Russia rather than Singapore). Singapore was regarded as very strong (though forget the myths about ‘impenetrable’ and ‘the guns pointing out to sea’- these were just stories for the public and senior commanders had other problems.

So Australia’s identity, previously entirely ‘British’, was threatened because Britain was in no position to help Australia, and in fact Churchill tried very hard to undermine Australia to help Britain. This resulted in a very sudden and complete embrace of the United States, as the only country that could save Australia from Japan- whom European Australia would have feared with great terror even if they didn’t happen to actually be a barbaric, rapacious and thoroughly evil people at this time (due to the hijack of their government by military psychopaths and a gutless, nasty little ‘emperor’).

After ww1 Australia saw itself as having done excellent service to the British empire- it showed itself to be loyal and selfless. After WW2, Australia had saved itself without British help, but this was only possible thanks to America. We became America’s satellite/ally, while our relationship with Britain became historic/cultural, but less political and military.

Susan asks…

I need a brief summary about the indian ocean STATES, and how it related to vasco d gama?

please also include the Portuguese relating to this, from the 1500′s thank you sooo much

admin answers:

This is after his African explorations:

Calicut, India
The fleet arrived in Kappad near Calicut, India on 20 May 1498. The King of Calicut, the Saamoothiri (Zamorin), who was at that time staying in his second capital at Ponnani, returned to Calicut on hearing the news of the European fleets’s arrival. The navigator was received with traditional hospitality, including a grand procession of at least 3,000 armed Nairs, but an interview with the Zamorin failed to produce any concrete results. The presents that da Gama sent to the Zamorin as gifts from Dom Manuel—four cloaks of scarlet cloth, six hats, four branches of corals, twelve almasares, a box with seven brass vessels, a chest of sugar, two barrels of oil and a cask of honey—were trivial, and failed to cut any ice. While Zamorin’s officials wondered at why there was no gold or silver, the Muslim merchants who considered da Gama their rival suggested that the latter was only an ordinary pirate and not a royal ambassador![11] Vasco da Gama’s request for permission to leave a factor behind him in charge of the merchandise he could not sell was turned down by the King, who insisted that da Gama pay customs duty—preferably in gold—like any other trader, which strained the relation between the two. Annoyed by this, da Gama carried a few Nairs and sixteen Mukkuva fishermen off with him by force.[12] Nevertheless, da Gama’s expedition was successful beyond all reasonable expectation, bringing in cargo that was worth sixty times the cost of the expedition.

Return

Vasco da Gama lands at Calicut, May 20, 1498.Vasco da Gama set sail for home on 29 August 1498. Eager to leave he ignored the local knowledge of monsoon wind patterns, which was still blowing onshore. Crossing the Indian Ocean to India, sailing with the monsoon wind, had taken Gama’s ships only 23 days. The return trip across the ocean, sailing against the wind, took 132 days, and Gama arrived in Malindi on 7 January 1499. During this trip, approximately half of the crew died, and many of the rest were afflicted with scurvy. Two of Gama’s ships made it back to Portugal, arriving in July and August of 1499.[13]

Vasco da Gama returned to Portugal in September 1499 and was richly rewarded as the man who had brought to fruition a plan that had taken eighty years to fulfill. He was given the title “Admiral of the Indian Seas,”[14] and his feudal rights to Sines were confirmed.[15] Manuel I also awarded the perpetual title of Dom (lord) to Gama, as well as to his brothers and sisters and to all of their descendants.

The spice trade would prove to be a major asset to the Portuguese economy, and other consequences soon followed. For example, Gama’s voyage had made it clear that the east coast of Africa, the Contra Costa, was essential to Portuguese interests; its ports provided fresh water, provisions, timber, and harbors for repairs, and served as a refuge where ships could wait out unfavorable weather. One significant result was the colonization of Mozambique by the Portuguese Crown.

However, Gama’s achievements were somewhat dimmed by his failure to bring any trade goods of interest to the nations of India. Moreover, the sea route was fraught with its own perils – his fleet went more than thirty days without seeing land and only 60 of his 180 companions, on one of his three ships, returned to Portugal in 1498. Nevertheless, Gama’s initial journey opened a direct sea route to Asia.

Lizzie asks…

what is the stem, and derivative of a Latin word?

a worksheet wants the stems and derivatives of latin words whats are those and how do you find them?
(10 points)

admin answers:

Hopefully this is what they meant…
Search ‘words derived from latin roots’

Latin Word – Definition – English Derivatives

villa villa, house
villa, village, villager

alta
tall, high, deep
altitude, altimeter, alto

antiqua
antique, old
antique, antiquity, ancient

longa
long
longitude, longevity, long

magna
large, great
magnify, magnificent, magnitude

pictura
picture
picture, picturesque, pictorial

nova
new
novice, novel, novelty, nova, Nova Scotia

terra
land, earth
terrier, terrace, terrestrial, terrain

prima
first
prime, primary, primitive, primeval

sub
under
subway, subterranean, suburban

corna
horn
cornucopia, cornet, clavicorn

est
is
estate, establish, essence

habere
have
have, habit, habitual

casa
small house
casino

via
street
via

parva
small
parval, parvanimity

lata
wide, broad
latitude, lateral, latitudinal

bona
good
bonus, bonanza, bona fide

copia
plenty
copious, cornucopia, copiously

fama
fame
fame, famous, infamous

provincia
province
province, provincial, provincialism

multa
many
multitude, multiple, multiplex

nominare
to name
nominate, nominal, name, nominative

postea
later
postlude, postgraduate posthumous

non
not
nonfction, nonmetal, nonexistent

in
in
in

aqua
water
aquatics, aquarium, aqueduct, aqueous

agricola
farmer
agriculture

bestia
beast
bestial, bestiality

figura
figure, shape
figure, figurine, figment, figurative

flamma
flame
flame, flamboyant, flambeau

herba
herb
herb, herbivorous, herbage

insula
island
insular, insulate, insularity

lingua
language
language, lingual, linguistics

nauta
sailor
nautical, nautilus

pirata
pirate
pirate, piratical

schola
school
scholar, school, scholastic

alba
white
albino, albinism albumen

amica
friendly
amicable, amicability, amity

beata
happy
beatific, beatify, beatitude

maritima
sea
maritime

mea
me
me, my

mira
strange
miracle, miraculous, mirage

nota
noted
noted, note, notice, notable, noticeable

obscura
dark
obscure, obscured, obscurity

periculosa
dangerous
perilous, peril

propinqua
near to
propinquity

pulchra
beautiful
pulchritude

quieta
quiet
quiet, quietude, disquiet

circum
around
circumstance, circumnavigate, circumspect

filia
daughter
filly, filial

Go to the next page of English words derived from Latin.

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