Your Questions About An Impaired Use Of Language Is Known As

November 29, 2013
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William asks…

Are all people diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome the same?

It was said that those who have AS seem to display things like social awkwardness, repetitive behavior and oddities in speech. I was wondering if it’s true for all AS patients. Maybe some might have it to a certain degree unlike another or maybe one person might have only a few of the symptoms. For instance, one might have social awkwardness but he doesn’t necessarily have any speech difficulties etc. You know what I mean?
Is this true for this type of autism?

admin answers:

Every individual with Asperger’s syndrome is different. There is a saying within the Asperger’s community that says “if you’ve met one person with Asperger’s syndrome, you’ve met one person with Asperger’s syndrome.” The symptoms and severity vary a lot between individuals and nobody has the exact same symptoms. There exists a lot of symptoms and traits that are connected with Asperger’s syndrome, but nobody has ALL of the known symptoms. Each person has a different set of symptoms and the severity and exact manifestations of the symptoms vary a lot.

There is however a certain criteria that must match in order for someone to be diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome. That criteria includes the hallmark symptoms of Asperger’s syndrome: qualitative impairment in social interaction, and restricted repetitive and sterotyped patterns of behavior, interests or activities. The exact details of how the person’s social interaction is impaired or which repetitive behaviors/interests/activities they have varies a lot between individuals.

All people with Asperger’s syndrome have delayed/limited social skills, which makes them socially awkward. Exactly which social skills they lack or how it affects them is very different between individuals. For example, some have major trouble reading into body language, while some have little or no trouble with that. Some tend to take everything literally and not understand things like sarcasm, metaphors and jokes, while some are less literal in their thinking and can understand non-literal things better. Some are unaware of most social rules and etiquette and don’t know how they are supposed to act in each situation, while some are more aware of those things. Some have a lot of difficulty connecting with other people and making friends, while some have less difficulty with that. And so on.

The repetitive behavior can for example be obsessive interest in a narrow subject, or a strong need for routines and sameness, or repetitive body movements. The person might wear the same kind of clothes every day or eat the same kind of food every day, do things in the same order all the time, need schedules and such to help them function. They might have difficulty dealing with changes, spontaneity, surprises and such (some have major difficulty with it, while some have little or none). The person may make repetitive movements (stims), which are used for self-stimulation to help the person deal with sensory issues, intense emotions and such. This can for example be hand flapping, leg bouncing, rocking, finger flapping etc.

Asperger’s syndrome is a spectrum disorder and can therefore vary a lot between individuals, with some individuals being more affected than others, and with every individual having a different set of symptoms.

Jenny asks…

Does anyone know where I can find REC 2 in English?

I need to know if there is a website that hosts REC 2 in English? I know it’s a Spanish film, but I’m visually impaired and have a really hard time keeping up with subtitles, so please let me know if there is a site that hosts the film in English. I’m absolutely dying to see it. Also, REC 3 just came out, so how long will it take to be available somewhere in English?

admin answers:

For a foreign film to be dubbed (be in english) a corporation has to hire a set of voice actors, well to voice the actors, and they wont because REC is a 18+ film, so they except any international viewers to be able to read subtitles if need be, and it wont be huge in the box office so no one will take the risk. Only animated films for kids get dubbed, anything beyond that id say stays in the foreign language.

Your outta luck

Thomas asks…

Why does my DVD keeps playing with commentary when I play it on my laptop?

I have a copy of Moon and it plays fine on my DVD player but when I try to play it on my laptop it keeps playing with the commentary. On the special features I keep clicking ‘off’ for the commentary but as soon as I play the film again its still the commentary version. Does anyone know of anyway to get round this? Thanks :)

admin answers:

In the DVD software you’re using on the laptop, right-click and see if there is an Audio or Languages option in the pop-up menu. If not there should be a Preferences or Setup option somewhere in the software. Quite often PC DVD software will override disc settings if a particular language is set as default… My software shipped with the default audio language set to “English (Vision Impaired)” and subtitles set to “English (Hard of Hearing)” so everything got an audio and text description of everything on the screen if it was available until I turned it off in the set-up options on the software!

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