Your Questions About An Impaired Use Of Language Is Known As

October 27, 2013
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Paul asks…

Can i be allowed to teach even if im hearing impaired?

Im a preschool teacher with a master’s degree, but also with profound hearing impairment in both ears. What are my chances of getting a job in the US or Canada as a teacher? Will my impairment affect my chances?
Im a preschool teacher with a master’s degree, but also with profound hearing impairment in both ears. What are my chances of getting a job in the US or Canada as a teacher? Will my impairment affect my chances? I do wear hearing aids but of course, they don’t work quite as well as normal hearing.

admin answers:

Absolutely! You can teach the hearing impared! In all honesty your “impairment” might actually make you more eligable for classes dealing with the hearing impaired. Do you know sign language? That’s a plus! And you’d also be able to understand, more than say me, on what it’s like being hearing impaired… That right there speaks loads, no pun intended ;-) . Students always respect most the teachers who’ve shared similar life experiences and gotten through them. You’d be perfect!

Helen asks…

How do you feel about people with disabilities? Do you think they need to have more rights?

I am hearing-impaired and I am doing this project for my American Sign Language Club. It would really help them to know of what the general population thinks.

admin answers:

I think that if we continue to give them more and more special rights, we are more separating them from everyday society and I feel that is kind of counter-productive. It ends up segregating them more. They should be able to live in and enjoy the good and bad of society like everyone else…or as close as they can get.
I hope this helps. :)

Robert asks…

what is it called when a person constantly shakes?

i have a kind of condition that causes me to constantly shake.. i don’t know what its called.

admin answers:

Saint Vitus Dance: WHAT: Chorea. Chorea (Sydenham’s): a neurological disorder characterized by purposeless, rapid, involuntary movements, emotional lability, and muscular weakness. WHY: Sydenham’s chorea is seen in rheumatic fever. The chorea may be associated with other rheumatic manifestations or it may present as the sole expression of rheumatic fever. HOW: Typically, the onset of chorea is gradual, with irritability, uncooperativeness, fits of anger, crying, and inappropriate behavior present before the choreiform movements are noted. The movements are rapid and jerky, unlike the slower, rhythmic motion seen in athetosis. Characteristically, on raising his arms above the head, the patient turns the arms so as to oppose the backs of the hands. The patient is unable to sustain a tetanic muscular contraction. On squeezing an examiner’s hand the patient can only provide a repetitive, spasmodic grip which is overly pronated and is similar to the motion of milking a cow (milk-maid’s grip)

Or Parkinsons disease.
Parkinson’s disease (also known as Parkinson disease or PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often impairs the sufferer’s motor skills, speech, and other functions.[1]

Parkinson’s disease belongs to a group of conditions called movement disorders. It is characterized by muscle rigidity, tremor, a slowing of physical movement (bradykinesia) and a loss of physical movement (akinesia) in extreme cases. The primary symptoms are the results of decreased stimulation of the motor cortex by the basal ganglia, normally caused by the insufficient formation and action of dopamine, which is produced in the dopaminergic neurons of the brain. Secondary symptoms may include high level cognitive dysfunction and subtle language problems. PD is both chronic and progressive.

Tin

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