Your Questions About An Impaired Use Of Language Is Known As

December 31, 2012
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Donald asks…

How to sign ferret in American sign language?

My daughter is hearing impaired, we need to know how to sign ferret without spelling it out so that she can sign it. I have looked every where and can’t find it.

admin answers:

My friend taught me an “F” handshape, palm down, scampering forward a little bit.

I’m not sure if it’s a common sign or not, so if signing with people that don’t know it, I would fingerspell it and use the sign to establish its meaning.

Mandy asks…

What would you like to know about sign language and the hearing impaired?

I am writing a report for an Honor’s College application on the hearing impaired. I’m polling to see what is of the most interest to a typical audience.

admin answers:

Being hearing impaired myself and not be part of the deaf community, I have always wondered why normal people believe I know sign language. I was never taught and was mainstreamed when I was young so I never had a interest in sign language. I was born with a hearing loss but won’t become deaf because my hearing nerves were not affected. I also hate when people assume that I’m deaf because they see my hearing aids.

Daniel asks…

Is sign language very different in different states or are they generally the same in every state?

I was planning on become a teacher for hearing impaired students and I was wondering if the ASL is different in other states. I’m planning on studying in NY but I might go to Oregon, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, or Maine. Thanks in advance!

admin answers:

Not every ASL is exactly the same.

Although ASL is used throughout the United States and English-speaking Canada and elsewhere where Americans and Canadians have established themselves, but every person has bits of different flavors to ASL. Different expressions, slightly different signs, new vocabulary, outdated vocabulary (often taught in books!), etc. I don’t know if I should compare these differences as “dialects” as sign languages are very different from spoken languages (and this holds true for all sign languages of the world — or as far as I know anyway) but yeah, if you’re just starting out in a classroom, you should first just follow what the instructor teaches because it’s proper and you want a good grade in the class, right? But what you could do in addition to just attending classes is to join a local deaf club. :)

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