Posts Tagged ‘ percent ’

Your Questions About If You Choose To Pull The Trigger

September 11, 2012
By


Lisa Your Questions About If You Choose To Pull The Trigger

Lisa asks…

This article from the Dallas Morning News about “DIVERSITY” was in the paper a few days ago. What do you think

By Trey Garrison / Special Contributor

When I made the hard decision to forgo buying a house in Dallas (and the easy decision to avoid the Potemkin village of DISD), I knew I was gonna get it. The thing is, I really wanted to live in Dallas, but we just couldn’t do it. So we chose Plano.

Once we pulled the trigger, the judgments came a-flyin’. Mainly it was from friends who are, well, urban yokels. You know the kind – hipper-than-thou provincialists, for whom where you reside in relation to a municipal taxing boundary defines you. (Fine, guys, you take the trendy bars and the home invasions; I’ll take the bland corporate sports grill and the gated community. We’ll split the teen heroin problem.) This was fine. Friends tease you like that. But then I started getting comments from readers at one of my other publications about “diversity,” whatever that means. Apparently, in choosing a house in one of the top school districts in the country, in a suburb where the poverty rate is low and the median income is high, I was guilty of the high crime of white flight.

My humbled, guilty reaction consisted of two words: “So what?”

I mean, what the heck does diversity mean? Some of my new neighbors in Plano include people from Thailand, Armenia, India, Afghanistan, Hong Kong, Colombia and the Ukraine, but apparently that doesn’t count. And when a school is 85 percent white, it’s not diverse, but when it’s 85 percent Hispanic, it is?

I was scolded that my daughter, by being in a Plano school, would be sheltered from – nay, ill-equipped for – life in the real world.

Well, yeah. Probably. The real world is a lot bigger than Dallas, bigger than (Sam Houston, forgive me) Texas, and bigger than the United States. The majority of the real world is dirty, violent, poor and absent indoor plumbing and two-ply toilet paper. More than half the world’s people live on something like $1 a day.

I don’t think attending Woodrow Wilson High equips you any better for that kind of outdoorsy, back-to-nature lifestyle than Plano West, but I admit I don’t know much about Woodrow’s elective courses. I want a school that will prepare her for living in a professional, high-paying world so Daddy won’t have to pound out columns in his dotage.

I was also told, most oddly, that by subjecting my kid to suburban life and suburban schools, she’d get no exposure to people from other cultures. That’s when it got silly. So I’d harrumph in my best Ted Baxter voice that’s crazy – why, the lady who does her nails is Vietnamese, and our lawn guy is a Mexican from Costa Rica or Panama or someplace.

Seriously, if the only exposure to other people your kid gets is when she’s sitting in a place where you move about like cattle at the sound of a bell and have to ask permission to go to the bathroom (i.e. school), what kind of sheltered life are you giving your kid?

It’s weird. We’ve made “diversity” into some kind of totem, an end to itself, and we haven’t even defined what it is. Do I learn more about a different perspective chatting with my Ukrainian neighbor (whom the census counts as white), or from a guy brought up five miles from me who happens to be black?

And I’m not entirely sold that diversity is automatically good.

Look, diversity is great when it comes to nightclubs, workplaces, cultural experiences, restaurants and all that. But I don’t want diversity in my neighborhood.

Now, put down the pitchfork. I don’t mean the superficial diversity of skin color. I mean diversity of values. That’s what I don’t want in my neighborhood, or my neighborhood school.

I want uniformly boring neighbors with uniformly boring, middle-class values who spend Saturdays working on their lawns and whose kids know to stay off mine. I want neighbors with Home Depot on speed dial. That’s how I choose to live. Your mileage may vary.

And isn’t that diversity, too?

admin answers:

Easy,only Leftist Marxists believe in that pc nonsense.But we all are affected by it.

Robert Your Questions About If You Choose To Pull The Trigger

Robert asks…

Please read this article about “Diversity” in the Dallas Morning News. What do you think? And Why?

By Trey Garrison / Special Contributor http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/opinion/viewpoints/stories/DN-garrison_28edi.ART.State.Edition1.4d66d0e.html

When I made the hard decision to forgo buying a house in Dallas (and the easy decision to avoid the Potemkin village of DISD), I knew I was gonna get it. The thing is, I really wanted to live in Dallas, but we just couldn’t do it. So we chose Plano.

Once we pulled the trigger, the judgments came a-flyin’. Mainly it was from friends who are, well, urban yokels. You know the kind – hipper-than-thou provincialists, for whom where you reside in relation to a municipal taxing boundary defines you. (Fine, guys, you take the trendy bars and the home invasions; I’ll take the bland corporate sports grill and the gated community. We’ll split the teen heroin problem.) This was fine. Friends tease you like that. But then I started getting comments from readers at one of my other publications about “diversity,” whatever that means. Apparently, in choosing a house in one of the top school districts in the country, in a suburb where the poverty rate is low and the median income is high, I was guilty of the high crime of white flight.

My humbled, guilty reaction consisted of two words: “So what?”

I mean, what the heck does diversity mean? Some of my new neighbors in Plano include people from Thailand, Armenia, India, Afghanistan, Hong Kong, Colombia and the Ukraine, but apparently that doesn’t count. And when a school is 85 percent white, it’s not diverse, but when it’s 85 percent Hispanic, it is?

I was scolded that my daughter, by being in a Plano school, would be sheltered from – nay, ill-equipped for – life in the real world.

Well, yeah. Probably. The real world is a lot bigger than Dallas, bigger than (Sam Houston, forgive me) Texas, and bigger than the United States. The majority of the real world is dirty, violent, poor and absent indoor plumbing and two-ply toilet paper. More than half the world’s people live on something like $1 a day.

I don’t think attending Woodrow Wilson High equips you any better for that kind of outdoorsy, back-to-nature lifestyle than Plano West, but I admit I don’t know much about Woodrow’s elective courses. I want a school that will prepare her for living in a professional, high-paying world so Daddy won’t have to pound out columns in his dotage.

I was also told, most oddly, that by subjecting my kid to suburban life and suburban schools, she’d get no exposure to people from other cultures. That’s when it got silly. So I’d harrumph in my best Ted Baxter voice that’s crazy – why, the lady who does her nails is Vietnamese, and our lawn guy is a Mexican from Costa Rica or Panama or someplace.

Seriously, if the only exposure to other people your kid gets is when she’s sitting in a place where you move about like cattle at the sound of a bell and have to ask permission to go to the bathroom (i.e. school), what kind of sheltered life are you giving your kid?

It’s weird. We’ve made “diversity” into some kind of totem, an end to itself, and we haven’t even defined what it is. Do I learn more about a different perspective chatting with my Ukrainian neighbor (whom the census counts as white), or from a guy brought up five miles from me who happens to be black?

And I’m not entirely sold that diversity is automatically good.

Look, diversity is great when it comes to nightclubs, workplaces, cultural experiences, restaurants and all that. But I don’t want diversity in my neighborhood.

Now, put down the pitchfork. I don’t mean the superficial diversity of skin color. I mean diversity of values. That’s what I don’t want in my neighborhood, or my neighborhood school.

I want uniformly boring neighbors with uniformly boring, middle-class values who spend Saturdays working on their lawns and whose kids know to stay off mine. I want neighbors with Home Depot on speed dial. That’s how I choose to live. Your mileage may vary.

And isn’t that diversity, too?

admin answers:

This is one of the things that concerns me. We are the United States of America, not the Diversified States of America. Dearborn Michigan has become the middle East of America. Garden Grove, Ca. Is the Vietnam of America. What has happened to assimilation. “Press one for Spanish”, “Your child needs to learn to speak Spanish”. The first thing that units a country is a common language. The root word of “Diversity” is “Divide”

Nancy Your Questions About If You Choose To Pull The Trigger

Nancy asks…

If you were at gun point and had to choose between 2 men…..?

One good on the inside, good heart, good person, would truly love you until the end of time, but mean on the outside, afraid of people, skeptical, like Oscar the grouch because he fears getting close to people, the other good on the outside, nice looking, good personality, fun to be with, exciting, yet on the inside he’s rotten, he decieves, cheats, lies. The grouch is difficult to get along with but means well, the nice guy is easy to get along with with selfish horrible intentions. Which would you choose. You can’t say neither because you‘re at gunpoint, and if you do, they’re going to pull the trigger.
One more thing, you‘re truly in love with Oscar the grouch, the other one truly loves you, the best way he knows how, you could probably have a half ass decent life with him because at least he’d be nice to you. Both of them would marry you, who do you choose? Oscar would be mean to your friends and family forever, the other would look like a shining star to them, but would probably be screwing other women within the next ten years.
And one more thing, for weird whoever, no one is being held at gunpoint to answer this question. If you don’t like the question, go away!!!!!

admin answers:

Depends… The one i would pick is the one that i love and loves me bak.

But since one loves me and the other one i love…

Personally… I think it is hard to force loving someone jus because they love you. And its easy to love someone you really love.

However… In the long run… If u pick the one you love and they don’t love you… Its even harder and hurts.

So i’d say… The one the love me !

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Your Questions About Eye Exercises For Better Vision

January 18, 2012
By


Susan Your Questions About Eye Exercises For Better Vision

Susan asks…

What are some non-surgical, not glasses or contacts ways to improve my eyesight?

Right now my eyesight isn’t too bad, but I do need glasses for distance. I heard there are eye exercises you can do that can help improve vision. Anyone know of these? I plan on going into the air force but if I don’t have really good vision I won’t be able to fly.

admin answers:

All these answers: exercises and carrots are the reason why 60 to 80 percent of Americans have blurry vision. Optometry has us trained well.

Most people are supposed to have natural perfect eyesight. Maybe 25% percent of people are legitimately supposed to have blurry vision from disease and 75% of those people could return to natural perfect health and have natural perfect eyesight by supporting the body in its healing and not cutting, burning, and poisoning.

We should avoid eye exercises(eye pushups, eye aerobics, eye yoga), they have nothing to do with natural perfect eyesight and have wasted so many people’s time and hope. Carrots and nutrition are very important for health but will not change vision behavior or bring us clarity.

Natural perfect eyesight is all about unlearning the incorrect vision habits, reintegrating the correct vision behaviors, and undoing the damage of artificial corrections and blur.

The best way to start learning about Natural Eyesight Improvement is to read the best books. I have a referral link to one of them on my website. Most people do best by getting the help of a local teacher. I can interview a teacher you may be interested in to make sure that they are teaching correct principles and not eye exercises or potions.

William Your Questions About Eye Exercises For Better Vision

William asks…

Is they’re any medication or exercise that will strengthen the eye?

I would like to make my vision stronger. I have noticed my vision is not that great. I have problems looking at things from a distance. Is they’re any exercise that will make my vision better? I do not want to buy glasses and I don’t have the money to pay for costly medication. I am a teenager and I am red-green colorblind. Thank you!!!

admin answers:

Glasses and contacts do not improve vision, in face they worsen it. This is becuase the eye are under worked – it is why peoples prescriptions get stronger over time.

Eye exercises work by relaxing and strengthening the eye to help change the shape of the eyeball (similar to what LASIK eye surgery does). A regime of 25 minutes of eye exercises a day would help your condition in 30-60 days.

A website below will start you off with a few eye exercises. I hope i helped icon smile Your Questions About Eye Exercises For Better Vision

Donna Your Questions About Eye Exercises For Better Vision

Donna asks…

Worser vision caused by stress?

For a few months I have had nearsightedness, today I can see almost clear now. Was my vision worse because I was stressing so much? For five years I was very stressed, and last year I had severe depression, I was thinking about suicide. This suicidal depression went on for about five months, I am not going to say why I was so depressed, but it was something very serious life changing thing. That’s when I have gotten very bad vision. About two months ago everything worked out in my life, because I finally got to do something I wanted to do for so long that will change my life forever. I’ve been never happier. I have seen changes in my vision, it becomes clearer and clearer every day. I also do eye exercises. Today, my vision is maybe not as great as it was five years ago but it’s much better. Also I am not suicidal anymore, I am ashamed of myself now, because I though about commiting it. Is this maybe the reason why my vision was bad?
No, that’s impossible because back then the TV was all blurry, today it isn’t.

admin answers:

Stress really does make your vision worse. It strains the eyes and is generally unhealthy anyway. With more sleep and healthier foods your eyes should get a little bit better. Try not to stress so much (i know what kind of advice that is, i used to be the queen of stress, i had 2 ap classes, dance, and a job), try to relax more often and try to get in a different atmosphere where it isn’t so depressing, get more in touch with your family and friends they wouldn’t want you to have a burden so heavy anyway that you might be considering suicide.. Trust me… But i’m glad that you didn’t icon smile Your Questions About Eye Exercises For Better Vision

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