Posts Tagged ‘ Marijuana ’

Your Questions About An Impaired Immune System

July 27, 2013
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Laura asks…

What negative effects does marijuana have on the body?

At school they said that on joint will have 4 times the negative effects on your lungs as 1 cigarette. Is this true? Are there any other PHYSICAL dangers of smoking marijuana?

admin answers:

Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in North America. Yet, myths continue regarding its effects on the body and brain. In this article you will learn the basic facts about Marijuana. What it is, what its effects are, what kinds of treatments are available and how to get help if you need it.

What is Marijuana?
Marijuana is a dry, shredded green/brown mix of flowers, stems, seeds, and leaves of the hemp plant Cannabis sativa, it usually is smoked as a cigarette (joint, nail), or in a pipe (bong). It also is smoked in blunts, which are cigars that have been emptied of tobacco and refilled with marijuana, often in combination with another drug. Use also might include mixing marijuana in food or brewing it as a tea. As a more concentrated, resinous form it is called hashish and, as a sticky black liquid, hash oil. Marijuana smoke has a pungent and distinctive, usually sweet-and-sour odor. There are countless street terms for marijuana including pot, herb, weed, grass, widow, ganja, and hash.

The main active chemical in marijuana is THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol). It is the way THC interacts with brain chemistry that causes the “high” from marijuana.

Effects on the Brain and Body
When someone smokes marijuana, THC rapidly passes from the lungs into the bloodstream, which carries the chemical to organs throughout the body, including the brain. The short-term effects of marijuana use can include:
• Problems with memory and learning;
• Distorted perception;
• Difficulty in thinking and problem solving;
• Loss of coordination; and
• Increased heart rate.

Research findings for long-term marijuana use indicate some changes in the brain similar to those seen after long-term use of other major drugs of abuse – changes that can include withdrawal symptoms when marijuana use is stopped. One study has indicated that a user’s risk of heart attack more than quadruples in the first hour after smoking marijuana.

A study of 450 individuals found that people who smoke marijuana frequently but do not smoke tobacco have more health problems and miss more days of work than nonsmokers. Many of the extra sick days among the marijuana smokers in the study were for respiratory illnesses. Even occasional use can cause burning and stinging of the mouth and throat, often accompanied by a heavy cough. Someone who smokes marijuana regularly may have many of the same respiratory problems that tobacco smokers do, such as daily cough and phlegm production, more frequent acute chest illness, a greater risk of lung infections, and a greater tendency to obstructed airways. Some of marijuana’s adverse health effects may occur because THC impairs the immune system’s ability to fight off infectious diseases and cancer.

Marijuana use has the potential to promote cancer of the lungs and other parts of the respiratory tract because it contains irritants and cancer causing chemicals. In fact, marijuana smoke contains 50 to 70 percent more cancer causing hydrocarbons than does tobacco smoke. Marijuana users usually inhale more deeply and hold their breath longer than tobacco smokers do, which increases the lungs’ exposure to cancer causing smoke. These facts suggest that, puff for puff, smoking marijuana may increase the risk of cancer more than smoking tobacco.

Research has shown that babies born to women who used marijuana during their pregnancies may have problems with brain development. During infancy and preschool years, marijuana-exposed children have been observed to have more behavioral problems and poorer performance on tasks of visual perception, language comprehension, sustained attention, and memory. In school, these children are more likely to show problems in decision-making skills, memory, and the ability to remain attentive.

Effects on Behavior and Learning
Depression, anxiety, and personality disturbances are all associated with marijuana use. Research clearly demonstrates that marijuana use has potential to cause problems in daily life or make a person’s existing problems worse. Because marijuana compromises the ability to learn and remember information, the more a person uses marijuana the more they are likely to fall behind in growing their intellectual, job, or social skills. In addition, research has shown that marijuana’s negative impact on memory and learning can last for days or weeks after the acute effects of the drug wear off.

Students who smoke marijuana get lower grades and are less likely to graduate from high school, compared to their non-smoking peers. In one study, researchers compared marijuana-smoking and non-smoking 12th-graders’ scores on standardized tests of verbal and mathematical skills. Although all of the students had scored equally well in 4th grade, the marijuana smokers’ scores were significantly lower in 12th grade.

Workers who smoke marijuana are more likely than their coworkers to have problems on the job. Several studies associate workers’ marijuana smoking with increased absences, tardiness, accidents, workers’ compensation claims, and job turnover. A study of municipal workers found that those who used marijuana on or off the job reported more “withdrawal behaviors”—such as leaving work without permission, daydreaming, spending work time on personal matters, and shirking tasks—that negatively affect productivity and morale.

Is Marijuana Addictive?
Long-term marijuana use can lead to addiction for some people; that is, they use the drug compulsively even though it often interferes with family, school, work, and recreational activities. Drug craving and withdrawal symptoms can make it hard for long-term marijuana smokers to stop using the drug. Feelings of irritability, sleeplessness, and anxiety are reported by people who are trying to quit.

Treatment
Group therapy that focuses on becoming aware of what feelings or events trigger marijuana use and then coming up with strategies to avoid use has been shown to have the most success. Although there are currently no medications proven to reduce cravings for marijuana, researchers have reported recent discoveries that may make a medication available that can help reduce cravings.

David asks…

What are the consequences of not getting enough sleep?

I have been having trouble getting enough sleep because of school and my big sister sometimes wakes me up while I’m sleeping because she likes bothering me. I’ve only been getting about 6 hours a night for the past month. Is this bad? What’s going to happen?
It doesn’t work. My mom just tells her to stop but she does it again.

admin answers:

Long-term sleep deprivation can be dangerous, but you’re at least getting a little sleep. What you could expect to see in you case might be:
Difficulty concentrating
Weight gain (when we’re tired, we tend to feel more hungry)
Headaches
Moodiness
An impaired immune system (ie you’re more likely to get sick more easily.)

Have your mom sit down and have a serious talk with your sister–and you should have one too.
You should try a sleep mask and/or ear plugs too.

Robert asks…

How can I tell if I have a staph infection on my tongue?

I have a small s shaped sore on my tongue, it began as an inflamed bump and now it looks more like a cut. It is sore like a burn and towards the tip of my tongue. I plan on seeing a doctor but I’m going to be traveling for work all week. I was wondering if anyone has had this before?

admin answers:

You cannot tell for sure if it is staph without being tested. It may be a canker sore. Canker sores are small shallow ulcers that appear in the mouth and often make eating and talking uncomfortable. Canker sores are a bit of a mystery, but they can occur at any age. They are not contagious. You just get them. There are two types of canker sores:

Simple canker sores. These may appear three or four times a year and last up to a week. They typically occur in people between 10 and 20 years of age.
Complex canker sores. These are less common and occur more often in people who have previously had them.

The exact cause of most canker sores is unknown. Stress or tissue injury is thought to be the cause of simple canker sores. Certain foods – including citrus or acidic fruits and vegetables (such as lemons, oranges, pineapples, apples, figs, tomatoes, and strawberries) – can trigger a canker sore or make the problem worse. Sometimes a sharp tooth surface or dental appliance, such as braces or ill-fitting dentures, might also trigger canker sores.

Some cases of complex canker sores are caused by an underlying health condition, such as an impaired immune system; nutritional problems, such as vitamin B-12, zinc, folic acid, or iron deficiency; and gastrointestinal tract disease, such as Celiac disease and Crohn’s disease.

To relieve pain and speed healing:

Rinse your mouth. Use salt water; baking soda (dissolve 1 teaspoon of soda in 1/2 cup warm water); hydrogen peroxide diluted by half with water; or a mixture of 1 part diphenhydramine (Benadryl) to either 1 part bismuth subsalicylate (Kaopectate) or 1 part simethicone (Maalox). Be sure to spit out the mixtures after rinsing.

Cover lesions with a paste made of baking soda.

Try over-the-counter products that contain a numbing agent, such as Anbesol and Orajel.

Avoid abrasive, acidic or spicy foods that can cause further irritation and pain.

Apply ice to your canker sores or allow ice chips to slowly dissolve over the sores.

Brush your teeth gently, using a soft brush and toothpaste without foaming agents, such as TheraBreath.

Dab a small amount of milk of magnesia on your canker sore a few times a day. This can ease the pain and may help the sore heal more quickly.

Check here for more information.

Http://dentistry.about.com/od/basicdentalcare/f/cankertreatment.htm

http://www.ehow.com/how_3069_treat-canker-sores.html

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/how-to-treat-canker-sores.html

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/canker-sores

http://www.cankersore.net/

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Your Questions About An Impaired Immune System

December 22, 2012
By

Jenny asks…

Marijuana Survey (edited for easy reading)?

For those with ADD and other issues with doing research, I’m listing a much easier reference in a simply image : http://tokerville.com/images/history-of-cannabis.jpg

This time line image takes 2 minutes to read and brings those that have been lied to for years up to date on the actual facts behind the law on Marijuana. For those that want more details read the research sources listed below. The resources are from Government, University and Medical sources and are all reputable.

(Please inform yourself through the reputable resources from our own government, medical research and major universities such as Harvard before making your comment.
Note: Much of what “some” Americans know about Marijuana is misinformation for the purpose of fighting hemp production (which grows 10x faster than trees and is a threat to the forestry industry) and big pharma that wants you on their drugs.

The survey:
1. Do you smoke (explain how much or if at all)
2. Do you want it legalized

A new report from the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) pegs the costs of marijuana law enforcement in the United States at $7.6 billion annually and finds that escalating marijuana arrests over the past two decades have failed to have any impact on marijuana use rates or other indicators chosen by drug enforcers to measure “success” in the war on drugs. What marijuana law enforcement has accomplished, the study found, is hundreds of thousands of arrests each year, with the burden of criminal sanctions borne disproportionately by the young and the non-white.
Current marijuana polices, which rely heavily on criminal penalties, are “wholly ineffective at controlling the use and sale of marijuana,” the study concluded.

Marijuana Myths
Marijuana Can Cause Permanent Mental Illness
Marijuana Is Highly Addictive
Marijuana Is More Potent Today Than In The Past
Marijuana Offenses Are Not Severely Punished
Marijuana Is More Damaging to the Lungs Than Tobacco
Marijuana Has No Medicinal Value
Marijuana Is a Gateway Drug
Marijuana’s Harms Have Been Proved Scientifically
Marijuana Causes an Amotivational Syndrome
Marijuana Policy in the Netherlands is a Failure
Marijuana Kills Brain Cells
Marijuana Impairs Memory and Cognition
Marijuana Causes Crime
Marijuana Interferes With Male and Female Sex Hormones
Marijuana Use During Pregnancy Damages the Fetus
Marijuana Use Impairs the Immune System
Marijuana’s Active Ingredient, THC, Gets Trapped in Body Fat
Marijuana Use is a Major Cause Of Highway Accidents
Marijuana Related Hospital Emergencies Are Increasing, Particularly Among Youth
Marijuana Use Can Be Prevented

Myth: Marijuana Can Cause Permanent Mental Illness.
Iverson, Leslie. “Long-term effects of exposure to cannabis.” Current Opinion in Pharmacology 5(2005): 69-72.
Weiser and Noy. “Interpreting the association between cannabis use and increased risk of schizophrenia.” Dialogues in Clincal Neuroscience 1(2005): 81-85.
“Cannabis use will impair but not damage mental health.” London Telegraph. 23 January 2006.
Andreasson, S. et al. “Cannabis and Schizophrenia: A Longitudinal study of Swedish Conscripts,” The Lancet 2 (1987): 1483-86.
Degenhardt, Louisa, Wayne Hall and Michael Lynskey. “Testing hypotheses about the relationship between cannabis use and psychosis,” Drug and Alcohol Dependence 71 (2003): 42-4.
Weil, A. “Adverse Reactions to Marijuana: Classification and Suggested Treatment.” New England Journal of Medicine 282 (1970): 997-1000.
Myth: Marijuana is Highly Addictive. Long term marijuana users experience physical dependence and withdrawal, and often need professional drug treatment to break their marijuana habits.
United States. Dept. of Health and Human Services. DASIS Report Series, Differences in Marijuana Admissions Based on Source of Referral. 2002. June 24 2005.
Johnson, L.D., et al. “National Survey Results on Drug Use from the Monitoring the Future Study, 1975-1994, Volume II: College Students and Young Adults.” Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996.
Kandel, D.B., et al. “Prevalence and demographic correlates of symptoms of dependence on cigarettes, alcohol, marijuana and cocaine in the U.S. population.” Drug and Alcohol Dependence 44 (1997):11-29.
Stephens, R.S., et al. “Adult marijuana users seeking treatment.” Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology 61 (1993): 1100-1104.
Myth: Marijuana Is More Potent Today Than In The Past. Adults who used marijuana in the 1960s and 1970s fail to realize that when today’s youth use marijuana they are using a much more dangerous drug.
King LA, Carpentier C, Griffiths P. “Cannabis potency in Europe.” Addiction. 2005 Jul; 100(7):884-6
Henneberger, Melinda. “Pot Surges Back, But It’s, Like, a Whole New World.” New York Times 6 February 1994: E18.
Brown, Lee. “Interview with Lee Brown,” Dallas Morning
For the comment about Asthma:

Smoking cigarettes, mowing and a number of other things are also bad for asthma, but would you spend 7 billion a year and place millions of otherwise law abiding citizens in jail for smoking cigs or mowing their yard?
For the person commenting on driving:

I personally don’t want to drive after smoking, but reliable research that I’ve provided shows that there is no significant difference in the ability of to drive while high contrasted with those that do not. In the same research it showed a significant difference in those that were drinking (note: they had more accidents and drove much faster while drinking.. where those smoking drove slower and were more cautious)
For the person that doesn’t like the sources:

Harvard, US Government, etc. are not biased resources. I showed the resources because of the reputation and legitimacy of them.

If you want to argue against Harvard and the like then go right ahead. Ill stick to peer reviewed research.
Current Opinion in Pharmacology 5(2005): 69-72.

Dialogues in Clincal Neuroscience 1(2005): 81-85.
“Cannabis use will impair but not damage mental health.” London Telegraph. 23 January 2006.

A Longitudinal study of Swedish Conscripts,” The Lancet 2 (1987): 1483-86.

New England Journal of Medicine 282 (1970): 997-1000.

Harvard… etc. etc. etc.

Ill stand by the research I posted.. It’s all from extremely reliable sources that can be verified through the institutions or our own government. Propaganda would be false statements of which I gave none. Each and every statement was not only true, but the sources were given to verify.

admin answers:

1) Yea
2) YES! Vote yes in November to legalize it in CALIFORNIA.

John asks…

Ongoing sickness?

Around two or more months ago I started getting cold symptoms and feeling unwell with temperature/fever, headaches, fatigue, etc., and I have been feeling ill ever since; I now have a lung infection and I just don’t feel normal at all. My ears are blocked, I have frequent headaches, am very tired and generally feel like I have a constant cold, on top of the infection, and also my digestive system doesn’t feel right. Before this I seldom got sick, and although I had severe asthma at a very young age I have not had any chest problems at all for at least ten or eleven years. I am on antibiotics for the chest infection but I still feel ill. I am eighteen-years-old and a strict vegan, and I don’t smoke or drink. The only other health problem I have is a vitamin B12 deficiency for which I have injections, and although my injections are not up to date I don’t think it would be affecting me like this as it never ever has before. It is as though my immune system has stopped working! :(

I will go back to the doctor next week if it has not cleared up, but I wonder if anybody has any suggestions as to why it might be, or if anyone has any similar experiences? Can lack of B12 impair the immune system, or could it perhaps be a parasite?

admin answers:

On going sickness can well be cured by cosulting a good physician and some tests done to know the specificity .Apart from that, to stay away fron such syndromes you can do pranayama’s from a expert as this holds the key to a stressfull and healthy life along with a healthy diet.Lung function can well be cured with special breathing processes that are learnt in yoga.

Paul asks…

Pre-Diabetes? My son is 13, has impaired glucose intolerance.?

Is there something he can take to boost his immune system so that the white blood cells discontinue attacking is islet cells.. or to SLOW the progression of the white blood cells that are attacking his islet cell? He has not had a BG over 200, but we are worried it is down the road and want to STOP it or delay it as long as possible.

admin answers:

Normal fasting blood glucose levels are below 100 mg/dL. People with pre-diabetes will have a fasting blood glucose level between 100-125. Diabetes occurs when a fasting blood glucose level is 126 mg/dl and above.Eat fewer calories. Exercise 30 minutes, 5 times a week. Adopt a low-fat diet. Loose 10 to 15 pounds. Here’s a website that may be helpful with your question. Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-diabetes.I wish you and your son the best of luck and good health.

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