Monthly Archives: May 2013

Your Questions About For Those Drivers Who Were Not Wearing Safety Belts At The Time Of Their Deaths

May 21, 2013
By

John asks…

what do you think about the new 2010 ford car features?

What do you think about the new features,
Do you think its better, worse, ??????

DETROIT – So you think junior is a little too lead-footed when he drives the family car? Starting next year, Ford Motor Co. will give you the power to do something about it.

The company will roll out a new feature on many 2010 models that can limit teen drivers to 80 mph, using a computer chip in the key.

Parents also have the option of programming the teen’s key to limit the audio system’s volume, and to sound continuous alerts if the driver doesn’t wear a seat belt.

“Our message to parents is, hey, we are providing you some conditions to give your new drivers that may allow you to feel a little more comfortable in giving them the car more often,” said Jim Buczkowski, Ford’s director of electronic and electrical systems engineering.

The feature, called “MyKey,” will be standard on an unspecified number of Ford models when the 2010 cars and trucks come out late next summer. The feature will spread to the entire Ford, Lincoln and Mercury lineup as models are updated, spokesman Wes Sherwood said.

Ford arrived at the 80 mph limit even though freeway speed limits are lower in most states because it wanted to leave a margin in case an unusual situation arises, Buczkowski said. In some states, freeway speed limits are above 70 mph, Sherwood said.

“Just lopping it off at exactly 70 mph was felt to be too limiting,” Buczkowski said.

The company already uses computer chips in its keys to prevent thefts. The car won’t start unless it recognizes the chip in the key.

“It’s making use of existing technology, and through the magic of software, we’re able to build features on top of the features we already have,” Buczkowski said.

In addition to speed limits, MyKey also will limit the volume of the audio system, and it will sound a six-second chime every minute if seat belts are not fastened. The chime sounds for adult drivers, too, but ends after five minutes to avoid annoying adults who adamantly don’t want to wear seat belts, Buczkowski said.

Parents also have the option of having the car sound a chime if the teen exceeds 45, 55 or 65 mph.

The feature will debut on the 2010 Focus compact car and quickly move to other company models as a standard feature, the company said.

Ford said its market research shows 75 percent of parents like the speed and audio limits, but as you might expect, 67 percent of teens don’t like them.

Danisha Williams, a 16-year-old senior at Southfield-Lathrup High School in suburban Detroit, said she’s against the idea.

“I wouldn’t want my parents to have that much control over how I’m driving,” she said. “If your parents are holding your hand, you’re never going to learn.”

Brittany Hawthorne, 17, another Southfield-Lathrup senior, said there may be emergency situations where she’d have to drive more than 80, possibly to accelerate to avoid a crash.

Ford’s research shows that parents would be more likely to let teens use their vehicles with the system, Sherwood said, and if it gets them the car more often, the number of teens objecting drops by nearly half.

A top official from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, a research group funded by the auto insurance industry that is pushing to raise the minimum driving age to 17 or 18, found the key intriguing and said she was not aware of any other manufacturer offering such a feature. IIHS says car crashes are the leading cause of death among teenagers.

“Research we’ve done has shown that speeding is a major factor in teen crashes, especially novice teen drivers,” said Anne McCartt, the institute’s senior vice president for research. “So I think a system that tries to correct the speeding behavior has the potential to improve safety.”

More than 5,000 U.S. teens die each year in car crashes. The rate of crashes, fatal and nonfatal, per mile driven for 16-year-old drivers is almost 10 times the rate for drivers ages 30 to 59, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Several U.S. auto insurers have begun offering in-car cameras or global positioning equipment to help parents monitor their teens’ driving behavior, in the hope of reducing the number of crashes.

admin answers:

I belive what Fords doing is great. And the features are very cool with a tunable speed limiter and audio limiter. Thats a parents dream which might boost sales. All this besides the rest of the new AWSOME features like the aluminum ball shifter and new engines.o man the new stang will be great. But besides te new stang. Ford is starting to finally realize what will sell and improving safty is a GREAT start.

Chris asks…

can you plrease proof read this…?

“Children should always wear a helmet while riding their bikes.” That common saying may contain the truth … about safety first with everything we do. Safety should never be taken unconscientiously. Teaching children important lessons whereas they are young is a safe investment. It should be required to wear bicycle helmets. The number one cause of death is head injury. The cost to insurance and the society to treatment of head injury is very high. Not to reveal long term care for enduring brain damage.

(how should i begin the second paragrapgh)

admin answers:

My guess is that this is a speech so i will not bother with punctuation.

“Children should always wear a helmet while riding their bikes.” That common saying may contain the truth … about safety first with everything we do. (everything we do?? )

“Children should always wear a helmet while riding their bikes.” That common saying may point to the truth … safety should be the first concern in everything we do.

Safety should never be taken unconscientiously. Teaching children important lessons whereas they are young, is a safe investment. It should be required to wear bicycle helmets. The number one cause of death is head injury. (for children, bike riders, or all people?)

The cost to insurance and society to the treatment of head injury is very high.

Not to reveal long term care for enduring brain damage. (i didn’t get this sentence)

.
.

By requiring children to wear a helmet, we are providing a foundation for them to understand that safety concerns is important, and not always optional. Just as wearing a seat belt in a car is mandatory, such it should be for helmet wearing on bikes.

The danger to the child is not the only concern. A driver who accidently hits a child is liable for injuries. This means that their insurance will have to pay for the medical bills, etc. An automobile insurance policy has a limit to which it will pay, which some state’s requiring as little as $25,000. Helmets help to keep medical bills under this limit so the driver does not have to lose their home or other assets, and often is the case, when the individual cannot afford to pay anything more then the insurance provides.

Mandatory helmet requirements also promp organizations to try to help those who could not afford helmets, get them. Because the helmet is required, there are more groups there to ensure every bike rider has one. If it was not required, would police stations, fire stations, and fraternal societies like Kiwakis clubs offer programs to ensure all kids got a helmet?

Helen asks…

Why aren’t others held partially responsible for not wearing seatbelts?

Can someone explain to me why the driver who caused a crash is held entirely responsible for death or injury for someone who chose NOT to wear a seatbelt? My state (and surrounding states) make seatbelt wearing mandatory, yet some guy was convicted of manslaughter even though the only reason she died was because the fool wasn’t wearing a seatbelt (all her passengers were belted and had slight injuries). Shouldn’t the judge take into account someone’s state-mandated responsibility for their own safety (or lack thereof)? Think about it. If you hit some SUV and they flip over in the ditch and one or more passengers are thrown from the car because they didn’t wear their seatbelts, why is the entire onus put on you for their choice not to use mandated safety equipment?
mnwomen, but for the fact that the fool wasn’t wearing a seatbelt, a crash would not have resulted in a death, possibly not even a major injury. Your argument is nonsense given that the other 3 passengers were only slightly injured. She died directly due to being ejected from the vehicle, not from the crash itself.

admin answers:

It’s counted in civil cases, and should certainly be in criminal as well. Given plea bargains, the defendant probably would not plead to a lesser charge that included jail time, and gambled on a jury trial.

Or perhaps the prosecutor was better that the defense attorney.

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Your Questions About For Those Drivers Who Were Not Wearing Safety Belts At The Time Of Their Deaths

May 20, 2013
By

Helen asks…

Why are humans concerned with “saving” people from death?

safety belt laws, smoking, blah blah blah blah why do people care, or rather pretend like they care? we all die, overpopulation is the greatest problem facing humanity, and yet we try so desperately to “save” people from the inevitable to prolong their lives. i don’t get it.

some people get sad when they hear about a strangers death. are they that weak? are we not animals?

i don’t give a **** who died if i don’t personally know them, or if someone i care about doesn’t. what is wrong with you people?
fascist? come at me bro, i’m so anti-government i could fly.

admin answers:

The obsession with safety today is nothing more than a euphemism for control.

It started with the government mandating each driver to wear a seat belt. Well, the best way to prevent injury in an accident is to avoid the accident in the first place, right? Who hears anything about making drivers better and more responsible? I don’t. Instead, I keep hearing how the car is made safer and safer to compensate for our stupid moments behind the wheel. What about the driver!?

This is just one example of how we’re being controlled under the guise of “safety”. Keep in mind that “saving lives” is big business. The bottom line is always the bottom line.

Birth and death are around us each day. That’s the nature of life. Let’s get used to it.

Sharon asks…

Is the date of our death pre-determined?

I’m bored and I wondered about topics that doesn’t really matter, but would be a great conversation starter.

Is the date, place, and how we die pre-determined? Just that we don’t really know when, where and how we’ll die?

Please, no sensitive remarks, else, you get reported and your answer will be removed.

admin answers:

Ecclesiastes 3:1, 2 speaks of “a time to die.” But, showing that this is not a predetermined fixed moment for the individual, Ecclesiastes 7:17 counsels: “Do not be wicked overmuch, nor become foolish. Why should you die when it is not your time?” Proverbs 10:27 says: “The years themselves of the wicked ones will be cut short.” And Psalm 55:23 adds: “As for bloodguilty and deceitful men, they will not live out half their days.” What, then, does Ecclesiastes 3:1, 2 mean? It is simply discussing the continuous cycle of life and death in this imperfect system of things. There is a time when people are born and a time when they die—usually at not more than 70 or 80 years of age, but sometimes sooner and sometimes later.—Ps. 90:10; see also Ecclesiastes 9:11.
If each one’s moment and manner of death were already fixed at the time of birth or earlier, there would be no need to avoid dangerous situations or to care for one’s health, and safety precautions would not alter mortality rates. But do you believe that a battlefield during war is as safe as one’s home far away from the war zone? Do you care for your health or take your children to the doctor? Why do smokers die three to four years younger, on an average, than nonsmokers? Why are there fewer fatal accidents when automobile passengers wear seat belts and when drivers obey traffic laws? Obviously, taking precautions is beneficial.

Lizzie asks…

can u plz proof read this…. thack you:)?

“Children should always wear a helmet while riding their bikes.” That common saying may point the truth; safety should be the first concern in everything we do. Safety should never be taken unconscientiously. Teaching children important lessons when they are young is a safe investment. It should be obligatory to wear bicycle helmets, seeing that the number one cause of death is head injury for all people. The cost to insurance and the society to treatment of head injuries are very high, not to reveal long term care for enduring brain damage.

By obligating children to wear a helmet, we are on condition that a foundation for them to understand that safety concerns is important, and not always optional. Just as wearing a seat belt in a car is mandatory, so such should be helmet wearing on bikes.

Choosing not to wear helmets whereas riding a bicycle is a very costly and unsafe risk one might be taking. The danger to the child is not the only concern. A driver who accidentally hits a child is liable for injuries. This means that their insurance will have to pay for the medical bills, etc. An automobile insurance policy has a limit to which it will pay. Helmets help to keep medical bills under this limit so the driver does not have to lose their home or other assets.

Mandatory helmet requirements also prompt organizations to try to help those who could not afford helmets, get them. Because the helmet is required, there are more groups there to ensure every bike rider has one.

admin answers:

“Children should always wear helmets when riding their bikes”.
That common statement points to the truth, in that safety should be the number one concern in everything we do. Safety should never be an after thought. Teaching our children important lessons when they are young is a good investment in their futures.Wearing helmets while riding a bicycle should be mandatory, since, in bike accidents, head injuries account for most of the ones that are suffered in cases where a helmet was not worn. The cost of long term care for head injuries is high, not to mention the insurance concerns.
By insuring that children wear helmets, we are teaching them that safety measures are not always optional. Just like wearing a seat belt in a car is the law, it should be likewise for wearing a helment, while riding a bike.
Choosing not to wear a helmet while riding a bicycle is not a risk worth taking.In the case of a car -bicycle crash, there is the issue of liabilities to be paid, likely by the driver of the car. If the one riding the bicycle had been wearing a helmet, the costs all around could be kept down, plus the loss of lives could be cut way down.
Mandatory helmet wearing for bicycle riders might prompt organizations to put up money to buy helmets for those who can’t afford them.

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Your Questions About For Those Drivers Who Were Not Wearing Safety Belts At The Time Of Their Deaths

May 19, 2013
By

Richard asks…

help with driving safely?

Okey I just started driving im inbetween could be a lot better, but I am scared to DEATH about hitting someone or hitting another car has anyone else ever felt this way? what do you do to make yourselves feel better? same with nursing help!
no mean answers please.

admin answers:

Hope for the best, expect the worst from other drivers. Always be aware of whats happening around you.

Watch your rear view mirror. You see that maniac back there, weaving in and out of traffic? Be ready for them, just maintain your lane position.

Watch out well ahead for brake lights. If you see many coming on at once be ready to slow up.

Always leave yourself an out if you can. That means keep an open spot like a space in the lane next next to you or the shoulder of the road or an added distance from the car in front of you in which to take evasive action to.

And if the worse happens, most modern autos have life saving safety features. Always wear your seat belt. I was in a 50 mph head-on collision a few years ago. The seat belt, air bag and engineered crumple zones built into the car surely saved my life. Even though my torso was one massive bruise, I suffered no serious injuries and only was in the hospital over night.

Good luck and stay safe.

Ken asks…

Please Check my Answer’s for my Drug and Alchol test Fl?

1 Stimulants________ the central nervous system.

Speed up or excite *
Help slow
Do nothing to

2 Safe following distance depends upon the speed you are traveling.

True *
False

3 A good scanning habit when approaching an intersection is to monitor roadway conditions.

True *
False

4 Stimulants are ________drugs.

Not
Very safe
Very dangerous *

5 A way to avoid “getting behind the wheel” if you have been drinking is_________.

Stay overnight where you have been drinking
Stay at home
Both options are correct *

6 A common type of injected drug is:

Morphine
Heroine
Both options are correct *

7 If your receive 12 points in 12 months, your license will be suspended for 10 days.

True
False *

8 Impaired drivers are responsible for the deaths of many pedestrians each year.

True *
False

9 It is your ___________ as a driver to have all children properly restrained or secured with a safetybelt.

Responsibility *
Indecision
Choice

10 __________ kills more people than you may realize.

Listening to music
Watching television
Falling asleep behind the wheel *

11 Children riding in the _____ are much less likely to be killed in a crash.

Back *
Middle of the front seat
Front

12 All drivers must yield right of way to emergency vehicles.

True *
False

13 Brakes are a very important safety feature on a motor vehicle.

True *
False

14 You should constantly scan the road ahead of you for possible driving situations.

True *
False

15 A short term effect of alcohol is:

Both options are correct *
Drowsiness
Confusion

16 Suspension means that your license is permanently taken away.

True *
False

17 Teen drivers have the highest crash risk of any age group.

True *
False

18 Tailgating is not an example of good traffic courtesy.

True *
False

19 Insurance companies are not allowed to cancel your insurance due to a suspended license.

True *
False

20 You should check engine coolant when the vehicle is cool.

True
False *

21 The shift from social drinking to problem drinking comes from the need to ____________.

Become a better driver
Find a better job
Find comfort and self-esteem *

22 A good rule for passengers riding in your vehicle is for them to wear seatbelts at all times.

True *
False

23 Elderly people are rarely killed on bicycles.

True
False *

24 If you need to use a cellular phone when driving, you should:

Find a safe place to pull off the road to use the phone *
Drive in a slow lane
Have a friend hold the steering wheel for you

25 Add ________ seconds to the 2 second rule when there is speed over 40 MPH.

2 *
3
1

26 A flashing red light means that you should stop.

True *
False

27 Drivers who run red lights are responsible for _____ crashes each year.

260,000 *
4
200

28 Most people need about seven or eight hours of sleep per night.

True *
False

29 If your vehicle breaks down, you should leave it sitting in traffic.

True
False *

30 The most common misconception is that marijuana is:

Green
Dangerous
Harmless *

31 The best way to avoid being the target of an aggressive driver is to _______________.

Hit someone with your vehicle
Practice traffic courtesy *
Be rude

32 Your parent or guardian must certify that you have had 50 hours of driving experience in order to obtain a standard driver license.

True *
False

33 When approaching a school bus,you should always_________.

Honk your horn
Slow down *
Speed up

34 Safety belts are designed to:

Be played with as a toy
Allow the strongest areas of your body to absorb the forces in a crash*
Be left off the body

35 To steer properly,___________.

Have only one finger on the wheel
Sit upright and keep both hands on the wheel *
Sit in a slouch position

36 A 12-ounce beer contains less alcohol than a 5-ounce glass of wine.

True
False *

37 Large trucks can weigh _______pounds.

10,000
4,000
80,000-100,00 *

38 Beer is the most common drink consumed by people stopped for alcohol impaired driving.

True *
False

39 When you are driving, always watch for ________ from those in other vehicles.

Erratic behaviors *
Bumper stickers
Both options are correct

40 Eating while driving is not a distraction.

True
False *

admin answers:

Jesus christ

Mark asks…

help me find this storie?

I only know that Nic and Adrian were both killed and it was a collision with a semi in WA state. I haven’t found any news stories on it tho. Let me know if you know where I can find this story!

admin answers:

It is unfortunate how high the traffic accident rate is, and because ho hum, people get killed all the time, the news media not always do story on it.

1. Get to a somewhat relevant News Search Engine

http://news.google.com/nwshp?tab=wn&ned=us&topic=n

2. Nic Adrian semi WA accident
are the keywords, except is “Nic” the correct spelling?
And would any article say “semi” or “truck” or ?
Would “WA” state (Washington) be spelled out, or more focused geography

No hits so let’s take individual words out & retry

http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&q=Nic+Adrian+semi+WA+accident&btnG=Search+News

Was the accident REALLY in WA (Washington) state or was it in VA (Virginia) … Your question dead bang correct or you had a typo?

I ask this because “Adrian” is name of someone in an accident in VA (Virginai) I do not see any “Nic” or “semi” in this story

Adrian Leonard was not killed
She was driving a pickup truck without a valid license
she was driving recklessly & lost control & crashed it
State police say that driving too fast around a curve contributed to the cause of the accident
The pickup truck went off the highway, overturned, and caught on fire

6 teenage girls were in the back of the pickup truck which is totally illegal, because no seat belts
34 states have laws prohibiting carrying passengers in the bed of pickup trucks. The Virginia law makes exceptions for over age 16, agricultural workers moving from field to field, and vehicles in a parade.

Other states exceptions include covered pickups, and Ok if speed below 25 mph

a 17 year old and 14 year old died at the scene
a 14 year old died on way to hospital
3 others were injured
names of the 3 dead girls = Brianna Peak, Ashley Leonard, Allison Turman

the 17 year old was inside the truck’s cab, which did have seat belts, but she was not wearing them … She would have lived had she worn them, as required by law

3 of 6, in the back of the pickup, below age of 16 … It is more serious crime to be placing children lives at risk, than placing adults lives at risk

Apparently in rural areas it is pretty common for teenagers to ignore safety rules about having people riding in the back of pick up trucks

Because Adrian is age 15 (a minor) she may escape being charged as an adult for causing the deaths of the others

The owner of the pick up truck is 18 year old Michael Scales who is also facing multiple charges for letting his vehicle be driven by an unlicensed driver and contributing to the delinquency of a minor. Michael lives in North Carolina, is not cooperating with Virginia authorities, who may seek extradtion on him

http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&ned=us&ie=UTF-8&ncl=1120653892

The above story also made it into the Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/09/05/AR2007090500556.html

Here’s an accident where West Viginia driver of auto lost control and ended up mixing it up with a semi from Adrian Michigan

http://www.times-news.com/local/local_story_256130013.html

Here’s an accident killing a bicyclist, and a person by the name of Adrian was charged with leaving scene of accident, which is much more serious when there’s injuries involved

http://www.wsbtv.com/news/14098322/detail.html

Adrian had got off the bus just before the train collided with a pick up truck and got 6 people injured, when the train derailed, so Adrian was a witness to this. Lucky no one got killed
http://www.sgvtribune.com/news/ci_6868924

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Your Questions About For Those Drivers Who Were Not Wearing Safety Belts At The Time Of Their Deaths

May 18, 2013
By

Joseph asks…

How to make a conclusion to this essay? 10 points help?

i need to finish this essay today … i really need a good conclusion

Driving a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol is one of the
most dangerous things you can do. There is a mass of research evidence
to show that driving performance and reaction times are seriously
affected by alcohol. If you drink and drive, you are not only a danger
to yourself but also to your passenger, other road users and
pedestrians. In fact, every 30 minutes, someone in this country dies in
alcohol-related crash. Every 30 minutes! And last year alone more than
one million people are injured in alcohol-related traffic crashes.

Alcohol is a depressant that slows down body reactions and the working
of the brain. Each year drunk driving is responsible for about 25% of
these deaths. The risks of drinking are alcohol-related accidents and
violence. The effects of alcohol are poor coordination and slurred
speech, double vision, decrease of self control loss of consciousness
and death. There are legal consequences due to drinking also. The more
a person drinks, the more their ability to make important decisions
becomes impaired. After just one drink, a driver can lose their ability
to perform the tasks necessary to drive a car. At a certain point, a
driver will become illegally intoxicated and can be arrested for
attempting to operate a motor vehicle. In every state on out country
there is a legal limit to how much alcohol you can have in your body if
you are driving. If you drink and drive you can lose your driver’s
license and even go to jail. Traffic crashes are the leading cause of
death for teens and young adults. More than 5,000 young people die
every year in car crashes and thousands more are injured. Drivers who
are 16 years old are more than 20 times as likely to have a crash as
are other drivers. There are two main reasons why teens are at a
higher for being in a car crash and lack of driving experience and
their tendency to take risks while driving. Teens drive faster and do
not control the car as well as more experienced drivers. Their judgment
in traffic is often insufficient to avoid a crash. In addition, teens
do most of their driving at night, which can be even more difficult.

Standard driver’s education classes include 30 hours of class-room
teaching and 6 hours of behind-the-wheel training. This is not enough
time to fully train a new driver. Teen drivers are more like to be
influence by peers and other stresses and distractions. This can lead
to reckless driving behaviors such as speeding, driving under the
influence of drugs and alcohol, and not wearing safety belts. There is
no safe amount that you can drink and still drive. Even one drink can
influence your driving offences. It is often too late by the time they
seek help. They face losing their license, having embarrassing court
appearances, press coverage and heavy fines. Many are just ordinary
people who have a few social drinks, get behind the wheel and then get
pulled over by the police. So try to manage your life so that you do
not drink and drive. If you go out for a drink, try to go somewhere
that you can reach either on foot or by public transportation. Think
about sharing the driving on different days with a group of people so
that you can take turns at driving. If you do drink even though you
meant not to, and you went out with your vehicle, consider taking a
taxi and leave your vehicle behind. This is a whole lot cheaper than
getting prosecuted!

admin answers:

To conclude you could put that you believe the drink driving adverts need to be stronger, perhaps more demonstrations to young people in schools. I know at my school in the sixth form we watched as a fire crew and ambulance team removed the roof of a ‘demo car’ and pulled free our volunteers whom were the head boy and girl. It really made me think twice about driving fast/drinking and driving. We also had an assembly where we watched really strong car crash adverts from other countries. Which really shocked everyone. I’ve put a link down in the source box, its a really strong advert which makes you think about the consequences of texting while driving.

Jenny asks…

give details about air bags and its function?

admin answers:

Introduction: Airbags Improve Automobile Safety
The Safety Advantage of Airbags
The development of airbags began with the idea for a system that would restrain automobile drivers and passengers in an accident, whether or not they were wearing their seat belts. The road from that idea to the airbags we have today has been long, and it has involved many turnabouts in the vision for what airbags would be expected to do. Today, airbags are mandatory in new cars and are designed to act as a supplemental safety device in addition to a seat belt. Airbags have been commonly available since the late 1980′s; however, they were first invented (and a version was patented) in 1953. The automobile industry started in the late 1950′s to research airbags and soon discovered that there were many more difficulties in the development of an airbag than anyone had expected. Crash tests showed that for an airbag to be useful as a protective device, the bag must deploy and inflate within 40 milliseconds. The system must also be able to detect the difference between a severe crash and a minor fender-bender. These technological difficulties helped lead to the 30-year span between the first patent and the common availability of airbags.

In recent years, increased reports in the media concerning deaths or serious injuries due to airbag deployment have led to a national discussion about the usefulness and “safety” of airbags. Questions are being raised as to whether airbags should be mandatory, and whether their safety can be improved. How much does the number of deaths or serious injuries decrease when an airbag and seat belt are used, as compared to when a seat belt is used alone? How many people are airbags killing or seriously injuring? Do the benefits of airbags outnumber the disadvantages? How can airbags be improved?

As seen in Figures 1 and 2, airbags have saved lives and have lowered the number of severe injuries. These statistics are continuing to improve, as airbags become more widely used. Nevertheless, as the recent reports have shown, there is still a need for development of better airbags that do not cause injuries. Also, better public understanding of how airbags work will help people to make informed and potentially life-saving decisions about using airbags.

Figure 1
This bar graph shows that there is a significantly higher reduction in moderate to serious head injuries for people using airbags and seat belts together than for people using only seat belts.

Figure 2
Deaths among drivers using both airbags and seat belts are 26% lower than among drivers using seat belts alone.

Overview of How Airbags Work
Timing is crucial in the airbag’s ability to save lives in a head-on collision. An airbag must be able to deploy in a matter of milliseconds from the initial collision impact. It must also be prevented from deploying when there is no collision. Hence, the first component of the airbag system is a sensor that can detect head-on collisions and immediately trigger the airbag’s deployment. One of the simplest designs employed for the crash sensor is a steel ball that slides inside a smooth bore. The ball is held in place by a permanent magnet or by a stiff spring, which inhibit the ball’s motion when the car drives over bumps or potholes. However, when the car decelerates very quickly, as in a head-on crash, the ball suddenly moves forward and turns on an electrical circuit, initiating the process of inflating the airbag.

Once the electrical circuit has been turned on by the sensor, a pellet of sodium azide (NaN3) is ignited. A rapid reaction occurs, generating nitrogen gas (N2). This gas fills a nylon or polyamide bag at a velocity of 150 to 250 miles per hour. This process, from the initial impact of the crash to full inflation of the airbags, takes only about 40 milliseconds (Movie 1). Ideally, the body of the driver (or passenger) should not hit the airbag while it is still inflating. In order for the airbag to cushion the head and torso with air for maximum protection, the airbag must begin to deflate (i.e., decrease its internal pressure) by the time the body hits it. Otherwise, the high internal pressure of the airbag would create a surface as hard as stone– not the protective cushion you would want to crash into!

Movie 1
Please click on the pink button below to view a QuickTime movie showing the inflation of dual airbags when a head-on collision occurs. Click the blue button below to download QuickTime 4.0 to view the movie.

What about the Gas Used to Fill the Airbag?
Chemical Reactions Used to Generate the Gas
Inside the airbag is a gas generator containing a mixture of NaN3, KNO3, and SiO2. When the car undergoes a head-on collision, a series of three chemical reactions inside the gas generator produce gas (N2) to fill the airbag and convert NaN3, which is highly toxic (The maximum concentration of NaN3 allowed in the workplace is 0.2 mg/m3 air.), to harmless glass (Table 1). Sodium azide (NaN3) can decompose at 300oC to produce sodium metal (Na) and nitrogen gas (N2). The signal from the deceleration sensor ignites the gas-generator mixture by an electrical impulse, creating the high-temperature condition necessary for NaN3 to decompose. The nitrogen gas that is generated then fills the airbag. The purpose of the KNO3 and SiO2 is to remove the sodium metal (which is highly reactive and potentially explosive, as you recall from the Periodic Properties Experiment) by converting it to a harmless material. First, the sodium reacts with potassium nitrate (KNO3) to produce potassium oxide (K2O), sodium oxide (Na2O), and additional N2 gas. The N2 generated in this second reaction also fills the airbag, and the metal oxides react with silicon dioxide (SiO2) in a final reaction to produce silicate glass, which is harmless and stable. (First-period metal oxides, such as Na2O and K2O, are highly reactive, so it would be unsafe to allow them to be the end product of the airbag detonation.)

Gas-Generator Reaction Reactants Products
Initial Reaction Triggered by Sensor. NaN3 Na
N2 (g)
Second Reaction. Na
KNO3 K2O
Na2O
N2 (g)
Final Reaction. K2O
Na2O
SiO2 alkaline silicate
(glass)
Table 1
This table summarizes the species involved in the chemical reactions in the gas generator of an airbag.

Note: Stoichiometric quantities are not shown.

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Questions on Chemical Reactions Used to Generate the Gas
Write a balanced chemical equation for the first reaction in the airbag gas generator (the decomposition of NaN3).
Write a balanced equation for the net gas-generating reactions (the combination of the first and second reactions).

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The Macroscopic Picture of Gas Behavior: Ideal-Gas Laws
Calculation of the Amount of Gas Needed
Nitrogen is an inert gas whose behavior can be approximated as an ideal gas at the temperature and pressure of the inflating airbag. Thus, the ideal-gas law provides a good approximation of the relationship between the pressure and volume of the airbag, and the amount of N2 it contains. (The ideal-gas law is PV = nRT,where P is the pressure in atmospheres, V is the volume in liters, n is the number of moles, R is the gas constant in L·atm/mol·K (R = 0.08205 L·atm/mol·K), and T is the temperature in Kelvin.) A certain pressure is required to fill the airbag within milliseconds. Once this pressure has been determined, the ideal-gas law can be used to calculate the amount of N2 that must be generated to fill the airbag to this pressure. The amount of NaN3 in the gas generator is then carefully chosen to generate this exact amount of N2 gas.

Estimating the Pressure Required to Fill the Airbag
An estimate for the pressure required to fill the airbag in milliseconds can be obtained by simple mechanical analysis. Assume the front face of the airbag begins at rest (i.e., initial velocity vi = 0.00 m/s), is traveling at 2.00×102 miles per hour by the end of the inflation (i.e., final velocity vf = 89.4 m/s), and has traveled 30.0 cm (the approximate thickness of a fully-inflated airbag).

The airbag’s acceleration (a) can be computed from the velocities and distance moved (d) by the following formula encountered in any basic physics text:
vf2 – vi2 = 2ad.
(1)

Substituting in the values above,

(89.4 m/s)2 – (0.00 m/s)2 = (2)(a)(0.300 m)
a = 1.33×104 m/s2.

(2)

The force exerted on an object is equal to the mass of the object times its acceleration (F = ma) ; therefore, we can find the force with which the gas molecules push a 2.50-kg airbag forward to inflate it so rapidly. 2.5 kg is a fairly heavy bag, but if you consider how much force the bag has to withstand (see Figure 5), it becomes apparent that a lightweight-fabric bag would not be strong enough. Note: In the calculation below, we are assuming that the airbag is supported in the back (i.e., all the expansion is forward), and that the mass of the airbag is all contained in the front face of the airbag.

F = ma
F = (2.50 kg)(1.33×104 m/s2)
F = 3.33×104 kg·m/s2 = 3.33×104 N.
(3)

(4)

Pressure is defined as the force exerted by a gas per unit area (A) on the walls of the container (P = F/A), so the pressure (in Pascals) in the airbag immediately after inflation can easily be determined using the force calculated above and the area of the front face of the airbag (the part of the airbag that is pushed forward by this force). Note: The pressure calculated is gauge pressure.

The amount of gas needed to fill the airbag at this pressure is then computed by the ideal-gas law (see Questions below). Note: the pressure used in the ideal gas equation is absolute pressure. Gauge pressure + atmospheric pressure = absolute pressure.

Deflation of the Airbag
When N2 generation stops, gas molecules escape the bag through vents. The pressure inside the bag decreases and the bag deflates slightly to create a soft cushion. By 2 seconds after the initial impact, the pressure inside the bag has reached atmospheric pressure.

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Questions on the Macroscopic Picture of Gas Behavior: Ideal-Gas Laws
A certain model of car is equipped with a 60.0-liter, 2.00-kg airbag that inflates at 2.00•102 miles per hour in the “h” direction (see figure below) and is 25.0 cm thick when fully inflated, as shown below.

Compute the area of the front face of the airbag when it is fully inflated. Show your calculation, including proper units. HINT: Think of the airbag’s shape as a cylinder whose height is 25.0 cm, the thickness of the inflated airbag, as shown in the diagram below. Remember, for a cylinder, V=bh, where b is the area of the base and h is the height of the cylinder. Assume that most of the mass is contained in the front face of the airbag.
Compute the gauge pressure (in atmospheres) inside the airbag when it inflates at 2.00•102 miles per hour. Show your calculation, including proper units. You may need to check the table of physical constants and conversions in your chemistry book to find some of the numbers you need.
Calculate the mass (in grams) of sodium azide required to generate enough nitrogen gas to fill the airbag at the pressure you calculated in part (b). Assume that the temperature of the gas is 25.0oC. Show your calculation, including proper units. (Note: the answer you determined in part (b) is gauge pressure. The ideal gas equation uses absolute pressure. Gauge pressure + atmospheric pressure = absolute pressure. Assume the atmospheric pressure is 1 atm.)
An automotive engineer proposes using a new fabric for airbags, which is cheaper but 30% heavier than the conventionally used nylon fabric. How would the implementation of this higher-weight airbag affect the amount of sodium azide required to fill the airbag in the same amount of time? Briefly, justify your answer.

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The Microscopic Picture of Gas Behavior: Kinetic Theory of Gases
Thus far, we have only considered the macroscopic properties (i.e., pressure and temperature) of the gas in an airbag from the point of view of the ideal-gas law, which is derived from experimental observations (i.e., empirically). Now we turn to a theoretical model to explain these macroscopic properties in terms of the microscopic behavior of gas molecules. The kinetic theory of gases assumes that gases are ideal (i.e., no interactions between molecules, and the size of the molecules is negligible compared to the free space between the molecules), but treats each molecule as a physical body that moves continually through space in random directions.

In a microscopic view, the pressure exerted on the walls of the container is the result of molecules colliding with the walls, and hence exerting force on the walls (Figure 3). When many molecules hit the wall, a large force is distributed over the surface of the wall. This aggregate force, divided by the surface area, gives the pressure.

Figure 3
This is a schematic diagram showing gas molecules (purple) in a container. The molecules are constantly moving in random directions. When a molecule hits the container wall (green), it exerts a tiny force on the wall. The sum of these tiny forces, divided by the interior surface area of the container, is the pressure.

An important relationship derived from the kinetic theory of gases shows that the average kinetic energy of the gas molecules depends only on the temperature. Since average kinetic energy is related to the average speed of the molecules (EK = mu2 / 2, where m=mass and u is the average speed), the temperature of a gas sample must be related to the average speed at which the molecules are moving. Thus, we can view temperature as a measure of the random motion of the particles, defined by the molecular speeds.

We see from the kinetic theory of gases that temperature is related to the average speed of the molecules. This implies that there must be a range (distribution) of speeds for the system. In fact, there is a typical distribution of molecular speeds for molecules of a given molecular weight at a given temperature, known as the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution (Figure 4). This distribution was first predicted using the kinetic theory of gases, and was then verified experimentally using a time-of-flight spectrometer. As shown by the Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions in Figure 4, there are very few molecules traveling at very low or at very high speeds. The maximum of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is an intermediate speed at which the largest number of molecules are traveling. As the temperature increases, the number of molecules that are traveling at high speeds increases, and the speeds become more evenly distributed (i.e., the curve broadens). A useful indication of a typical speed in the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is the root-mean-square speed (urms), which depends on the temperature and the molecular weight of the gas according to the formula

(5)

where R is the gas constant in J/mol?K (R = 8.3145 J/mol·K), T is the temperature in K, and M is the molecular weight in kg/mol.

Figure 4
The Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution can be shown graphically as the plot of the number of molecules traveling at a given speed versus the speed. As the temperature increases, this curve broadens and extends to higher speeds.

As seen in Figure 4, there is a unique distribution curve for each temperature. Temperature is defined by a system of gaseous molecules only when their speed distribution is a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Any other type of speed distribution rapidly becomes a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution by collisions of molecules, which transfer energy. Once this distribution is achieved, the system is said to be at thermal equilibrium, and hence has a temperature.

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Questions on the Microscopic Picture of Gas Behavior: Kinetic Theory of Gases
Helium is a noble gas that is not used to fill airbags because there is no convenient and economical way to generate a large amount of He gas quickly. From your examination of the Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions in Figure 4 in the tutorial and the formula for urms, predict whether the root-mean-square speed of the gas molecules in an airbag at 25.0oC would increase, stay the same, or decrease if He were used instead of N2. Briefly, explain your reasoning.
On one graph, sketch the Maxwell-Boltmann distributions for He and N2.

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How Does the Presence of an Airbag Actually Protect You?
Newton’s familiar first law of motion says that objects moving at a constant velocity continue at the same velocity unless an external force acts upon them. This law, known as the law of inertia, is demonstrated in a car collision. When a car stops suddenly, as in a head-on collision, a body inside the car continues moving forward at the same velocity as the car was moving prior to the collision, because its inertial tendency is to continue moving at constant velocity. However, the body does not continue moving at the same velocity for long, but rather comes to a stop when it hits some object in the car, such as the steering wheel or dashboard. Thus, there is a force exerted on the body to change its velocity. Injuries from car accidents result when this force is very large. Airbags protect you by applying a restraining force to the body that is smaller than the force the body would experience if it hit the dashboard or steering wheel suddenly, and by spreading this force over a larger area. For simplicity, in the discussion below, we will consider only the case of a driver hitting the steering wheel. The same arguments could, of course, be applied to a passenger hitting the dashboard, as well.

Recall from Equation 3,

F = ma, where

.

(6)

F is the force on the body, and if F>0, the body is accelerating; if F HN3 + NaOH.

HN3 is highly toxic, volatile (i.e., it becomes airborne easily), and explosive.

What can be done to prevent these reactions of sodium azide in undetonated airbags? Somehow, the airbags must be prevented from going through the automobile-recycling process. Warning devices that would alert recyclers to the presence of an undetonated airbag in flattened car hulks have been tested, but these are generally expensive to implement, and they would need to be in every automobile airbag. Also, it is extremely difficult or impossible to remove an airbag from a car that has already been flattened, and so the question of what to do with these flattened cars containing airbags remains unanswered. This will become an increasingly large problem, as airbags have recently become mandatory equipment in new automobiles. Hence, the proportion of cars with airbags in recycling plants will increase. A better solution is to remove the airbag canister before the car is sent for flattening or recycling. This is cheaper, simpler, and more efficient, and allows the car to be recycled safely. This strategy is already used for other hazardous components of cars, such as lead-battery cases. However, there is an added incentive for removing batteries that is not yet applicable for removing airbags from cars before recycling. The lead from batteries can be re-sold, but currently there is no market value for airbag canisters. Thus, strictly-enforced laws or a market-based incentive system may be required to ensure that airbags continue to protect our safety, even after the lifetime of the automobiles that contain them.

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Questions on Undetonated-Airbag Disposal
Suggest a way to flatten cars for recycling so that airbags in vehicles would all deploy.
If you wanted to use a different set of chemical reactions to generate gas for airbags, what characteristics should the reagents have?

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Summary
Airbags have been shown to significantly reduce the number and severity of injuries, as well as the number of deaths, in head-on automobile collisions. Airbags protect us in collisions by providing a cushion to decrease the force on the body from hitting the steering wheel, and by distributing the force over a larger area. The cushion is generated by rapidly inflating the airbag with N2 gas (from the explosive decomposition of NaN3 triggered by a collision sensor), and then allowing the airbag to deflate.

Fundamental chemical and physical concepts underly the design of airbags, as well as our understanding of how airbags work. The pressure in the airbag, and hence the amount of NaN3 needed in order for the airbag to be filled quickly enough to protect us in a collision, can be determined using the ideal-gas laws, and the kinetic theory of gases allows us to understand, at the molecular level, how the gas is responsible for the pressure inside the airbag. Newton’s laws enable us to compute the force (and hence the pressure) required to move the front of the airbag forward during inflation, as well as how the airbag protects us by decreasing the force on the body.

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Additional Links:
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety maintains an informative site about airbag safety, including QuickTime movies that demonstrate the effectiveness of airbags.
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gives updates on airbag safety, especially regarding new laws allowing certain people to purchase on-off switches for their airbags. The site also includes QuickTime crash-test videos.
This site from Technical Services Forensic Engineering shows a photograph of the collision sensor that triggers airbag deployment.
The University of Wisconsin Why Files site also has an informative page about airbags.

Or http://www.chemistry.wustl.edu/~edudev/LabTutorials/Airbags/airbags.html

Charles asks…

Question: Do I write well?

I’m doing some Criminal Minds Fanfiction. Even if you don’t know it, you should be able to ‘grade’ my writing on a scale of one to ten… ENJOY!

Chapter 1 | Spencer Reids POV
_____

BEEP. BEEP. BEEP.
Spencer moaned and rolled over on his king size bed to his alarm clock, blasting with the same monotonous BEEPing sound over and over again. He slammed the snooze button, and smiled with satisfaction as it stopped.
“Ahh, sweet silence. Thank God…”
He said to himself as he got up and stretched, his long 6’1″ frame looking lanky, skinny, and about as nerdy as a TI-84 Plus graphing calculator. With glasses.
He took his morning shower, got dressed (managing to find and wear the two most mismatched socks in the world) and prepared his coffee, pouring more than the suggested amount of sugar into his mug. He wondered if Garcia had any treats that were Sucrose-filled today in her dark little room of magic. He hoped she did.
He went outside, leather bag in hand, and waited for Morgan. Usually he would drive to work by himself, but his car broke down and would not work. At all. He’d have to get it repaired soon, but he probably would have no time to call a mechanic. Maybe he could call one right now…
Spencer got out his phone and remembered “Quantico’s Finest Mechanic’s” number, perfectly placed in the corner of page 219 of the Yellow Pages, but before he could dial it, Morgan was there, looking at him from his black Audi.
He jogged to the car, got in, and fastened his seat belt without hesitation, and as quickly as possible.
Morgan looked at him, an eyebrow raised.
“Do you really think that I–”
“Morgan, do you know how many deaths could have been prevented by wearing a seat belt in a car crash?” He interrupted.
“No. And I don’t want to know, pretty boy. Besides, we’ve got airbags, Reid. And I’m a good driver, if I do say so myself.” He looked at Reid, chuckled, and went back to looking at the traffic-less road.
“Well, an air bag increases the effectiveness of a safety belt by 40 percent. But air bags were never meant to be used in place of safety belts, since they don’t protect against side impacts at all. And even if you’re a good driver, a bad driver may still hit you.” He looked at him.
Morgan sighed. “Never mess with a genius..”
“I’m just stating facts here! These are proven statistics, and I don’t want to be part of those statistics!” He said, his voice a bit high pitched as he fought.
“Look, you’ll never be part of those statistics, especially not now.” Morgan said, a smirk forming on his face
“Why not?” Reid raised his eyebrows.
“…Because I just parked the car. Guess boy genius isn’t paying attention..” Morgan laughed as he got out of his car, and slammed the door.
“Oh…” Reid pursed his lips and got out of the car as well, shutting the door behind him. Morgan locked the car, his laughter reduced to a chuckle.
“So, what kind of new case do you think we have today?” Reid asked as they entered the building.
“I have no clue, Reid.” He said as they entered the elevator
“You sure?”
“Think so. I heard some stuff though, when I was leaving yesterday night.. A guy named Jonathan McCarter, he’s a ‘perfectionist’ in a way and killing cause of it.”
The elevator doors slid open, and they both walked into the BAU’s office.

(Gahh, hopefully this was good for 12 am, haha. Please rate out of ten stars, and if you can, give me some tips ;D Also, would people enjoy me continuing this? I know this first chapter is vague, but I can type up a second chapter and see how you guys respond? Thanks, :D )

admin answers:

You might get more answers over at the Books & Authors section, just for your information.

I feel as though this was a bit wordy in the first couple of paragraphs. There’s just too much information that doesn’t seem necessary. For example, “king size bed”, “TI-84 Plus graphing calculator”, “page 219″. In reference to the calculator, it’s nice that you put in a simile, but the reference is a bit too specific for my taste. Of course, I’d have to read more to see if this description was useful or not, as I’m not too familiar with Spencer’s character at the moment.

The rest of the writing from that point on wasn’t bad. The dialogue shows more of Spencer’s and Morgan’s personalities, and makes them more realistic. The only thing I took notice of what that the flow of dialogue seemed a bit choppy. It might be because there dialogue tags or interruptions in speaking after almost every spoken part. However, it’s only a minor point.

Spelling was pretty good, as was grammar. Punctuation could be a bit better. But again, minor points.

Overall, grading on a casual scale, I’d give this 7.5/10.

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Your Questions About For Those Drivers Who Were Not Wearing Safety Belts At The Time Of Their Deaths

May 17, 2013
By

Jenny asks…

“Everything happens for a reason” what are the various religious views on this?

admin answers:

DOES BELIEF IN FATE MAKE SENSE?
Some persons feel that it does not. They reason, for instance, that any safety precautions would be quite unnecessary if everything that happens to a person were predestined. And yet safety measures, such as the wearing of seat belts and the reducing of speed limits, have cut down road deaths.
It is estimated that three of every four car accidents were avoidable if proper care had been taken by the drivers; so such accidents did not “have” to happen. Much depends on how a person drives. It is often just as the Bible says: “Whatever a man is sowing, this he will also reap.”—Gal. 6:7.
Some things, such as prayer, would lose their meaning if everything were predestined. For instance, a seriously ill man was visited by a neighbor who firmly believed in predestination. The visitor offered to pray so that the ailing man would not die. But the sick man asked: “Do you believe that I have a fixed time to die?” “Oh, yes,” came the positive reply. “Well, then, if my time is up, it would be of no use to pray, and if my time is not up, surely there is no need to pray.” Do you agree? The Bible says That “time and unforeseen occurrence befall them all.” (Eccl. 9:11) Yes, an “unforeseen occurrence” can happen to anyone. If a person happens to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, he may meet a fatal accident. It was not that this was his predestined “time,” but something occurred “unforeseen” or by chance.
‘Time and unforeseen occurrences befall all persons.’ What, then, does the writer mean?
Though God has the power to know when a person will die, he does not predestine the specific time. Otherwise, why would the Bible say: “The very fear of Jehovah will add days, but the years themselves of the wicked ones will be cut short,” and that wicked men “will not live out half their days”?—Prov. 10:27; Ps. 55:23.
Our way of life can often affect how long we live. The Bible shows that our fate, to a large extent, is in our own hands.
We should live in a manner that shows we value our life. Conscientiously we ought to try to stop habits and careless ways that can definitely shorten life.
In addition, by learning to show the proper “fear of Jehovah” we may add years to our life. How? Well, the God-given guidelines in the Bible can help us to live a moral life. This enables us to avoid self-centered, uncontrolled pursuit of pleasure, which can shorten life.
Please study your bible with one of Jehovah’s Witnesses and enjoy finding bible truth and what the bible really teaches Take care

Paul asks…

Can u please give me some reasons why people under 18 should not be allowed to drive?

some “fresh” or new ideas.tnx!

admin answers:

Here is a lot of reasons but there is even more then I listed:
According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, although teen drivers (ages of 15 and 20) constitute almost 7 percent of all licensed drivers, they are involved in 14 percent of fatal motor vehicle-related crashes. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), a 16-year-old driver is more than 20 times as likely to have a motor vehicle crash than any other licensed driver. In fact, the leading cause of death among 16- to 20-year-olds is motor vehicle-related crashes.
Adolescents are far less likely to use seat belts than any other age group.

When adolescents drive after drinking alcohol, they are more likely than adults to be involved in a crash, even when drinking less alcohol than adults.

Adolescents also cause a disproportionate number of deaths among non-adolescent drivers, passengers, and pedestrians.

Alcohol is involved in nearly 35 percent of adolescent (15 to 20 years) driver fatalities.

There are two main reasons why teenage drivers are at increased risk for motor vehicle-related crashes that result in injury or death, including the following:
lack of driving experience
Lack of experience means the teenage driver is less able to detect and respond to traffic hazards, less in control of his/her vehicle, and less able to integrate speed.

Risk behavior of teenagers
Teenagers tend to take more risks as they are influenced by their emotions, stress, and peer pressure. In addition, experimenting with alcohol and recreational drugs can impair the teenager’s driving ability. Also, teenage drivers tend to not use their seat belts, increasing their risk of injury in a crash. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), less than one-fourth of high school students say they always wear their seat belts when another person is driving.

Betty asks…

How to make the paragraphs of this essay shorter but make it longer??? 10 points best answer?

Driving a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol is one of the
most dangerous things you can do. There is a mass of research evidence
to show that driving performance and reaction times are seriously
affected by alcohol. If you drink and drive, you are not only a danger
to yourself but also to your passenger, other road users and
pedestrians. In fact, every 30 minutes, someone in this country dies in
alcohol-related crash. Every 30 minutes! And last year alone more than
one million people are injured in alcohol-related traffic crashes.

Alcohol is a depressant that slows down body reactions and the working
of the brain. Each year drunk driving is responsible for about 25% of
these deaths. The risks of drinking are alcohol-related accidents and
violence. The effects of alcohol are poor coordination and slurred
speech, double vision, decrease of self control loss of consciousness
and death. There are legal consequences due to drinking also. The more
a person drinks, the more their ability to make important decisions
becomes impaired. After just one drink, a driver can lose their ability
to perform the tasks necessary to drive a car. At a certain point, a
driver will become illegally intoxicated and can be arrested for
attempting to operate a motor vehicle. In every state on out country
there is a legal limit to how much alcohol you can have in your body if
you are driving. If you drink and drive you can lose your driver’s
license and even go to jail. Traffic crashes are the leading cause of
death for teens and young adults. More than 5,000 young people die
every year in car crashes and thousands more are injured. Drivers who
are 16 years old are more than 20 times as likely to have a crash as
are other drivers. There are two main reasons why teens are at a
higher for being in a car crash and lack of driving experience and
their tendency to take risks while driving. Teens drive faster and do
not control the car as well as more experienced drivers. Their judgment
in traffic is often insufficient to avoid a crash. In addition, teens
do most of their driving at night, which can be even more difficult.

Standard driver’s education classes include 30 hours of class-room
teaching and 6 hours of behind-the-wheel training. This is not enough
time to fully train a new driver. Teen drivers are more like to be
influence by peers and other stresses and distractions. This can lead
to reckless driving behaviors such as speeding, driving under the
influence of drugs and alcohol, and not wearing safety belts. There is
no safe amount that you can drink and still drive. Even one drink can
influence your driving offences. It is often too late by the time they
seek help. They face losing their license, having embarrassing court
appearances, press coverage and heavy fines. Many are just ordinary
people who have a few social drinks, get behind the wheel and then get
pulled over by the police. So try to manage your life so that you do
not drink and drive. If you go out for a drink, try to go somewhere
that you can reach either on foot or by public transportation. Think
about sharing the driving on different days with a group of people so
that you can take turns at driving. If you do drink even though you
meant not to, and you went out with your vehicle, consider taking a
taxi and leave your vehicle behind. This is a whole lot cheaper than
getting prosecuted!

admin answers:

What? Shorter and longer at the same time – that’s a trick I’d like to see!

I think you need to revise your intitial premise: “Driving a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol is one of the most dangerous things you can do.” – It’s not logically correct. I can think of many things that are a lot more dangerous, like jumping out of a plane without a parachute, to name but one.

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